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Autonomic regulation of blood pressure in premature and early menopausal women

Recruiting

The goal of this study is to learn more about the effects of menopause on women's blood pressure and heart health. We are looking for women between the ages of 35 and 70 years to participate in the study. Participants may be pre- or postmenopausal; we are specifically interested in evaluating the influence of premature (< age 40 years) and early (< age 46 years) menopause.

I'm interested

Female
35 Years to 70 Years old
This study is also accepting healthy volunteers
Inclusion Criteria:

• Aged 35-49 or 50-70 years of age who experienced premature (<40) or early (≤45) menopause
• Premenopausal 35-49 years of age
• Typical-age menopause (i.e., after 45 years of age), who are between 50-70 years old
• Menopause will be confirmed by subject report of amenorrhea for 12 months and serum FSH of >30 mIU/mL
Exclusion Criteria:

• Current nicotine/tobacco use within the past six months
• Are diabetic or asthmatic
• Have diagnosed significant carotid stenosis
• Have a history of significant autonomic dysfunction, heart disease, respiratory disease or a severe neurologic condition such as stroke or traumatic brain injury.
• Have existing metabolic or endocrine abnormities
• Take any heart/blood pressure medications that are determined to interfere with study outcomes
• IF the participant is premenopausal AND currently taking OC or other exogenous steroids that are determined to interfere with study outcomes
• Females who classify as having early or premature menopause AND are not willing to discontinue OC or MHT in order to complete the study
• Are pregnant or breastfeeding

Diagnostic Test: Microneurography to measure muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), Diagnostic Test: Baroreflex sensitivity testing, Diagnostic Test: Sympathoexcitatory Maneuvers, Diagnostic Test: Blood tests

Hypertension, Menopause, Premature, Menopause, Blood Pressure

Emma Lee - leex4357@umn.edu
Manda Keller-Ross
STUDY00004979
NCT04439370
See this study on ClinicalTrials.gov

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